Camping check-in is at New Discovery State Park
6993 State Forest Rd
Groton, VT 05046
Season: May 19th - Columbus Day Weekend
Day Use Hours: 10am - official sunset
Camping Group/ Remote Camping: 26 lean-to sites for group camping, 7 remote lean-to's, 1 remote tent site.
Pets Pets are not permitted on the beach but are allowed elsewhere throughout the park.

Park Updates & Alerts

  • On June 2nd through the 4th, several trails will be closed for public safety due scheduled events nearby at the shooting range: Coldwater Brook Trail at the Nature Center, the Telephone Line Trail around Big Deer campground, and Peacham Bog Trail into/ out of the gravel pit
From I-91N (Exit 17):
Take a left onto US-302 west, go 8.7 miles. Turn right onto VT-232N. Travel 7.5 miles and Kettle Pond is on the left.
From Groton:
Go 2 miles west on U.S. 302, then 7.5 miles NW on VT 232.
Camping Group/ Remote Camping: There are 26 lean-to's arranged into five separate groups. There are also 7 remote lean-to's and 1 remote tent site.
Hiking Hiking: In addition to the Kettle Pond Trail, Groton State Forest offers over 17 miles of hiking trails.
Swimming Swimming: There is a campers beach and lots of great swimming in Kettle Pond.
Boating Boating: Boats are welcome at the park. There are also 4 canoes available to rent at New Discovery State Park.
Fishing Fishing: Rainbow trout, perch and small mouth bass can be found in Kettle Pond.
Mountain Biking Mountain Biking: Groton State Forest has over 20 miles of multi-use trails great for mountain biking.
Nature Program Nature Programs: The Groton Nature Center is a short drive away.

This park is one of seven parks in the Groton State Forest. These parks are all within close proximity to one another (some within walking distance) and entry to one provides free entry to all. Combined, the parks offer a range of activities and attractions.

Welcome

Breakfast on the grill
Breakfast on the grill

As early as 1704 Native Americans and the French were using routes through Groton to reach Canada and Massachusetts. Colonists settled this area of Vermont slightly earlier than the rest of the state due to the accessibility the network of waterways provided.

The rocky, tree-covered hillsides were originally covered by white pine, spruce, hemlock, beech, maple and birch. They were logged by local farmers for lumber, fuel and potash. The logging industry was large scale for almost 100 years while the railroad was operating. Today, logging is still a vital industry in the area, but has lost some of its dominance in favor of modern society's leisure time movement: private cottages and seasonal homes, park development and a variety of outdoor recreation activities.

Facilities / Amenities

The campground is located on the shores of Kettle Pond, an undeveloped pond. There are 26 lean-to's arranged into five separate groups designed to accommodate a variety of different groups and organizations such as scouts, churches, clubs or other social institutions. There are two composting toilets and two double pit toilets. There is no potable water at this site, but you can get water at nearby New Discovery State Park. There is a campers' beach and miles of hiking and multiple use trails in Groton State Forest. 7 remote lean-to’s and one remote tent platform are also available.

Additionally, the Groton Nature Center is nearby and serves all the state parks in the Groton State Forest.

Day use parking: Day use parking for hiking and boating is separate from the campground and is located adjacent to VT Route 232. The hiking trail and boat portage trail is located in the northwest corner of the parking near the kiosk.

State Park Passes

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